GUIDELINE for Feline immunodeficiency virus

Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a retrovirus of the genus Lentivirus that is closely related to HIV; however, humans are not susceptible to the cat virus, which occurs in 5 subtypes (clades) worldwide.

GUIDELINE for Feline rabies

Rabies is one of the oldest and most feared diseases of humans and animals – it was recognized in Egypt before 2300 BC and in ancient Greece, where it was well described by Aristotle.

GUIDELINE for Influenza virus infections in cats

Influenza is a highly contagious, acute infection, usually of the upper respiratory tract, and has been detected worldwide in many vertebrate hosts (Krammer et al., 2018). Feline respiratory diseases caused by influenza viruses appear to be rather rare and usually self-limiting;

GUIDELINE for Chlamydia felis

Chlamydia felis is a Gram-negative bacterium that is an obligate intracellular parasite of cats. Chlamydia felis does not survive outside of the host so close contact between cats is required for transmission, usually via ocular discharges. Chlamydiosis typically affects young cats under 9 months of age.

GUIDELINE for Bordetella bronchiseptica infection in cats

Bordetella bronchiseptica (Bb) is a primary respiratory pathogen of cats, particularly in high population density conditions such as rescue shelters and multicat households.

Bordetella (B.) pertussis, B. parapertussis and Bb are closely-related Gram-negative coccobacilli that colonise the respiratory tracts of mammals. B.