2015 Young Scientist Award Winners Paweł Bęczkowski and Emily Porter

Paweł Bęczkowski: BETTER UNDERSTANDING FIV INFECTION
The 2015 AMYSA for Basic Research was presented to Dr Pawel Beczkowski (31), a Polish resident in internal medicine (ECVIM) at the Small Animal Hospital at the University of Glasgow, UK.

While studying at the University’s Centre for Virus Research, he focused on

GUIDELINE for Disinfectant choice in feline veterinary hospitals, shelters and cat households

Regardless of whether a pathogen is viral, bacterial, parasitic or fungal, or an emerging unknown, the mainstay of infectious disease prevention is hygiene, and the cornerstone of good hygiene is effective disinfection.

2014 Young Scientist Award Winners Katarzyna Zabielska and Katja Silbermayr

Katarzyna Zabielska: developing tools against injection site sarcoma
The 2014 AMYSA for Basic Research was presented to Katarzyna Agnieszka Zabielska, assistant professor at the department of small animal diseases at the Warsaw University of Life Sciences, for her work on the effect of biocomplex of colloid gold nanoparticles with

Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery (2015 issue)

(Link to the 2015 issue)
This issue contains update articles of the 2009 and 2013 guidelines, and new recommendations for cats with different lifestyles, rescue shelter cats and breeding catteries – which we have called “Matrix vaccination guidelines”.

GUIDELINE for Blood transfusion in cats

Blood transfusion in dogs and cats is more commonly done than in the past and fresh whole blood can be made available to clinicians because it is taken from in-house donor cats or “volunteer” feline blood donors.

GUIDELINE for Feline Injection-Site Sarcoma

In cats, invasive sarcomas (mostly fibrosarcomas), so called “feline injection-site sarcomas” (FISS), are the most serious adverse effects following vaccination. They develop at sites of vaccination or injection. They have characteristics that are distinct from those of fibrosarcomas in other areas and behave more aggressively.

GUIDELINE for Borna virus infection

Borna disease virus (BoDV)-1 historically affects horses and sheep (for review see Ludwig and Bode, 2000). The disease was first described in 1855 in horses which became severely sick, near the German town of Borna (cited in Lundgren et al., 1995).

GUIDELINE for West Nile virus infection

West Nile virus (WNV) is a zoonotic mosquito-borne virus belonging to the family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus in the Japanese encephalitis antigenic group. It is an enveloped virus containing a single molecule of linear, positive-sense, single-stranded RNA.

GUIDELINE for Streptococcal infections

This beta-haemolytic Lancefield group G gram-positive bacterium is considered part of the commensal mucosal flora of the oral cavity, upper respiratory tract, genital organs and perianal region in cats. The infection seems to be sporadic in single-cat households, especially in older cats (Greene and Prescott, 2012).

GUIDELINE for Cytauxzoonosis

Cytauxzoon species are emerging apicomplexan haemoparasites (order Piroplasmida, family Theileriidae) of wild and domestic cats, transmitted by ticks. Cytauxzoon felis is the main species of felids found in the Americas and China while in the Old World Cytauxzoon manul and closely related species are reported.

GUIDELINE for Hepatozoonosis

Hepatozoonosis of domestic cats has been reported in several countries, mainly as a subclinical infection.

The infection has been described mostly in the same areas where canine infection is present and, in recent years, different species Hepatozoon felis and Hepatozoon silvestris, have been identified by molecular techniques.

The vector for

GUIDELINE for Lungworm disease

Cardiopulmonary nematodes are emerging parasites of dogs and cats in Europe which have received growing attention by researchers in recent years. Significant progress has been made, mainly in the diagnosis and treatment of infection.

Aelurostrongylus abstrusus (Strongylida, Angiostrongylidae) is the best-known feline lungworm and is regarded as the most prevalent