ABCD Merial Young Scientist Award (AMYSA) for Clinical Research

Publication date: 17/09/2012

This year's ABCD/Merial Young Scientist Award (AMYSA) for Clinical Research went to Dr. med. vet. Bianca Stützer (right) from the Medizinische Kleintierklinik, Ludwig Maximilian Universität, Munich, Germany. The jury reached her decision in February to select her submission of "Role of regressive feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) infection in cats with aregenerative bone marrow suppression or lymphoma" for the prize. Her work ranked first in the jury's opinion, and some of the qualifications read: "…conclusions of her work maybe be the most appreciated by general practitioners... should be placed alone in this category …good study, limited in time (veterinary dissertation), providing interesting data."  FeLV is one of the most common fatal pathogens in cats, and when infections progress, this may lead to proliferative, neoplastic, and degenerative disorders. These, however, are also seen in FeLV antigen-negative animals, and frequently, no underlying process can be found that would explain the development of a tumour or of bone marrow suppression. A regressive FeLV infection, undetected by routine antigen testing is then suspected by veterinarians as the underlying cause for the syndromes.   The conclusion was reached that only few (5%) cats with non-regenerative cytopenia and none with lymphoma or leukaemia had been regressively infected by FeLV. Also, the prevalence of regressive FeLV infections is lower than expected in cats with disorders that are generally caused by FeLV infection.This year's ABCD/Merial Young Scientist Award (AMYSA) for Clinical Research went to Dr. med. vet. Bianca Stützer (right) from the Medizinische Kleintierklinik, Ludwig Maximilian Universität, Munich, Germany. The jury reached her decision in February to select her submission of "Role of regressive feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) infection in cats with aregenerative bone marrow suppression or lymphoma" for the prize. Her work ranked first in the jury's opinion, and some of the qualifications read: "…conclusions of her work maybe be the most appreciated by general practitioners... should be placed alone in this category …good study, limited in time (veterinary dissertation), providing interesting data."

FeLV is one of the most common fatal pathogens in cats, and when infections progress, this may lead to proliferative, neoplastic, and degenerative disorders. These, however, are also seen in FeLV antigen-negative animals, and frequently, no underlying process can be found that would explain the development of a tumour or of bone marrow suppression. A regressive FeLV infection, undetected by routine antigen testing is then suspected by veterinarians as the underlying cause for the syndromes. 

The conclusion was reached that only few (5%) cats with non-regenerative cytopenia and none with lymphoma or leukaemia had been regressively infected by FeLV. Also, the prevalence of regressive FeLV infections is lower than expected in cats with disorders that are generally caused by FeLV infection.

 

 

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